Cumulative CAMAG Bibliography Service CCBS

Our CCBS database includes more than 11,000 abstracts of publications. Perform your own detailed search of TLC/HPTLC literature and find relevant information.

The Cumulative CAMAG Bibliography Service CCBS contains all abstracts of CBS issues beginning with CBS 51. The database is updated after the publication of every other CBS edition. Currently the Cumulative CAMAG Bibliography Service includes more than 11'000 abstracts of publications between 1983 and today. With the online version you can perform your own detailed TLC/HPTLC literature search:

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      131 007
      Principal component analysis and DoE-Based AQbD Approach to Multipurpose HPTLC method for synchronous estimation of multiple FDCs of metformin HCl, repaglinide, glibenclamide and pioglitazone HCl
      P. PRAJAPATI*, K. RADADIYA, S. SHAH (*Department of Quality Assurance, Maliba Pharmacy College, Uka Tarsadia University, Tarsadi, Gujarat, India; pintu.prajapati@utu.ac.in)

      J Chrom Sci, bmad055 (2022). Standards of antiglycemic drugs were metformin hydrochloride (S1, a biguanide), glibenclamide (S2 = glyburide, a sulfonylurea), pioglitazone hydrochloride (S3, a thiazolidinedione), repaglinide (S4, a glinide). Samples were methanolic solutions of commercial tablets of S1 with each of the other molecules. The following method was developed by a software-assisted AQbD approach (analytical quality by design): (1) Several TLC separations were tried with toluene together with other solvents and with acidic or basic modifiers, with also variations of 24 method or instrumental parameters. (2) Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed in order to identify two principal components (PCs) responsible for 98 % of the observed variations: namely, resolution and tailing factor. Three critical method parameters (CMPs) had a statistically significant impact on the PCs: mobile phase (MP) composition, ammonium acetate concentration in MP, and saturation time. (3) To optimize these CMPs, the Box–Behnken design was implemented in 15 software-proposed experiments; the impacts of the 3 CMPs on the 2 PCs were evaluated by ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, and 2D and 3D contour plots. (4) The optimal CMPs ranges were determined by defining a MODR (method operable design region) on the superposed contour plots, and one TLC condition was selected as analytical control point.
      TLC on silica gel pre-washed with 10 mL methanol, dried and activated 10 min at 100° C. Separation with toluene – ethyl acetate – methanolic solution of 4 % ammonium acetate 7:7:6 after 15 min pre-saturation with 35 % relative humidity. Absorption emasurement at UV 254 nm. The hRF values were 13 for S1, 72 for S2, 82 for S3, 38 for S4. LOQ were 263, 387, 73 and 35 ng/zone, respectively. Linearity range was 25–75 µg/zone for S1, 100–300 ng/zone for S2 and S4, 750–2250 ng/zone for S3. Intermediate precision was below 2 %. For accuracy tests, recovery rates were between 97.6–101.4 %.

      Classification: 2e, 5c, 7, 8b, 17a, 17c, 23d, 23e, 24, 32a
      131 006
      Application of Taguchi OA and Box–Behnken design for the implementation of DoE-based AQbD approach to HPTLC method for simultaneous estimation of azilsartan and cilnidipine
      P. PRAJAPATI*, P. TAILOR, A. SHAHI, A. ACHARYA, S. SHAH
      (*Department of Quality Assurance, Maliba Pharmacy College, Uka Tarsadia University, Tarsadi, Mahuva, Surat, Gujarat, India; pintu21083@gmail.com)

      J Chrom Sci, bmad045 (2022). Standards were azilsartan medoxomil (AZL) and cilnidipine (CLN). Samples were acetonitrile solutions of commercial tablets of AZL and CLN, and purified human blood plasma as biological fluid spiked with AZL and CLN. The following method was developed by a software-assisted AQbD approach (analytical quality by design): (1) Taguchi orthogonal array design was implemented in 8 screening experiments in order to identify the 3 critical method variables (CMVs), which were: volume ratio of toluene – ethyl acetate, volume of methanol and saturation time. These CMVs had statistically significant impact (one-way ANOVA and Pareto charts) on the 3 critical analytical attributes (CAAs, they were: resolution between AZL and CLN and their hRF values). (2) To optimize these CMVs, the Box–Behnken design was implemented in 15 software-proposed experiments; the impacts of the 3 CMVs on the 3 CAAs were evaluated by ANOVA, multiple regression analysis, and 2D and 3D contour plots; the response surface analysis allowed the software to find a mathematical (quadratic or linear) equation for each CAA, based on the CMVs values. (3) The optimal CMVs ranges were determined by defining an analytical design space (ADS) on the superposed contour plots, and one TLC condition was selected as analytical control point.
      TLC on silica gel pre-washed with 10 mL methanol, dried and activated 15 min at 110° C. Separation with toluene – ethyl acetate – methanol 13:3:4 after 15 min pre-saturation with 35 % relative humidity. Absorption measurement at UV 254 nm. The hRF values were 49–51 for AZL and 70–71 for LRT. Linearity range was 400–2000 ng/zone for AZL and 100–500 ng/zone for CLN. Intermediate precision was below 1.6 % (n=3). LOQ were 121 ng/zone for AZL and 34 ng/zone for CLN. Recovery rates were 99.3–99.7 % for AZL and 98.1–99.5 % for CLN. Recovery rates from spiked plasma were 83.3 % for both molecules.

      Classification: 2e, 7, 8b, 16, 23d, 23e, 32a
      110 005
      Dielectroosmotic effects in electric current pulse
      Virgina COMAN*, S. KREIBIK, C. TUDORAN, Ocsana OPRIS, Florina COPACIU (*Babe-Bolyai University, “Raluca Ripan” Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele Street, 400294, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, coman_virginia@yahoo.com)

      J. Planar Chromatogr. 25, 504-508 (2012). Physical properties of polar and non-polar solvents under electric current pulse were studied. In addition, solvents were classified according to their behavior in a pulsating electric field with applications in planar dielectrochromatography.

      Classification: 2e
      68 075
      Two-dimensional planar chromatographic separation of a complex mixture of closely related coumarins from the genus Angelica
      P. HÄRMÄLÄ, L. BOTZ, O. STICHER, R. HILTUNEN*, (*Pharmacognosy Div., Dept. of Pharm., Univ. Helsinki, SF-00170 Helsinki, Finland)

      J. Planar Chromatogr. 3, 515-520 (1990). One- and two-dimensional OPLC of 16 coumarins on silica with chloroform in the first and 30% ethyl acetate in the second direction. Visualization under UV 254 and 366 nm. Quantification by densitometry (absorbance at 310 nm). Preassays on TLC; discussion of the transfer of the separation from TLC to 2D TLC and further to 2D OPLC. The PRISMA system was used to optimize the chromatographic conditions.

      Classification: 2e, 8
      72 019
      Computer-aided optimization of gradient multiple development thin-layer chromatography
      W. MARKOWSKI, (Dep. Inorg. and Anal. Chem., Med. Acad., Staszica 6, 20-081 Lublin, Poland)

      Part II. Multi-stage development. J. Chromatogr. 635, 283-289 (1993). Presentation of a theoretical model of gradient multiple development as a basis for the optimization of separation by planar multi-step development and AMD and a computer program for the calculation of final Rf values for multi-stage development in the gradient mode for known retention vs. eluent composition relationship. Discussion of the influence of various parameter on the final Rf values. Comparison of the predicted and experimental Rf values.

      Keywords: AMD
      Classification: 2e
      79 013
      Multicomponent mobile phases in adsorption TLC - Quaternary mobile phases
      I. MALINOWSKA, J.K. ROZYLO*, (Fac. of Chem., M. Curie-Sklodowska Univ., Pl. M. Cuire-Sklodowsiej 3, 20-031 Lublin, Poland)

      Proc. 9th. Internat. Symp. Instr. Chromatogr., Interlaken, April 9.-11., 187-194 (1997). Presentation of some regularities between solvent strength and situation of separation optimum into optimization triangles. The procedure may be divided into different steps: Choice of the optimum of solvent strengths; choice of the composition of the other binary mobile phases; choice of the composition of isocratic ternary mobile phases; choice of the composition of isocratic quaternary mobile phases. The presented method is considered as fast, cheap, and good for solvent optimization in four component mobile phases for different solvents used as "strength moderator".

      Keywords:
      Classification: 2e
      87 023
      Retention of aromatic hydrocarbons with polar groups in binary reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography
      T.H. DZIDO*, D. POLIT, (*Dept. of Inorg. and Anal. Chem., Med. Acad., Staszica 6, 20-081 Lublin, Poland)

      J. Planar Chromatogr. 14, 80-87 (2001). HPTLC of 45 aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols, aromatic compounds with proton-acceptor groups, aromatic compounds with proton-donor and proton-acceptor groups) on RP-18, RP-18 W, and silanized silica gel with mobile phases containing appropriate proportions of water and organic solvent (methanol, acetonitrile or tetrahydrofuran) and 1% acetic acid. Visualization under UV. The selectivity of the RP-TLC systems tested is highly dependent on the mobile-phase modifier used.

      Keywords:
      Classification: 2e, 5b
      115 008
      Chromatographic-densitometric analysis of chosen fluoroquinolones on TLC plates using mobile phases with different viscosity
      J. KRZEK*, Barbara ZUROMSKA, Urszula HUBICKA, Marta KACZMARSKA (*Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 9 Medyczna Street, 30-688 Kraków, Poland, jankrzek@cm-uj.krakow.pl)

      J. Liq. Chromatogr. Relat. Technol. 38, 1113-1120 (2015). HPTLC of orbifloxacin (1), danofloxacin (2), ciprofloxacin (3), norfloxacin (4), enrofloxacin (5), marbofloxacin (6), difloxacin (7) and ofloxacin (8) on silica gel with 1,4-dioxane - ammonia - tetrahydrofuran 6:3:2. Quantitative determination by absorbance measurement at 320 nm. The hRF value was 19 for (4), 23 for (3), 30 for (2), 37 for (8), 40 for (6), 44 for (5), 56 for (1) and 59 for (7). Linearity was in the range of 159-513 ng/zone for (1), 99-238 ng/zone for (2), 97-244 ng/zone for (3), 69-163 ng/zone for (4), 63-170 ng/zone for (5), 103-250 ng/zone for (6), 84-251 ng/zone for (7) and 94-260 ng/zone for (8). LOD and LOQ were 53 and 159 ng/zone for (1), 32 and 98 ng/zone for (2), 32 and 97 ng/zone for (3), 23 and 69 ng/zone for (4), 21 and 63 ng/zone for (5), 34 and 103 ng/zone for (6), 28 and 84 ng/zone for (7) and 31 and 94 ng/zone for (8), respectively. Selection of appropriate viscosity of the mobile phase may be important in obtaining optimal chromatographic separation.

      Classification: 2e, 32a